Five Super Bowl 58 Prop Bets To Avoid

The level of competition for sportsbooks to post unique and rare prop bets for the Super Bowl is quite high. Each sportsbook crafts hundreds of prop bets for bettors to take advantage of, many offering long, appealing-looking odds that promise big payouts.

Some of these prop bets are worth taking a look at. Some, however, are among the worst bets you can make on the Super Bowl.

Below, we look at five Super Bowl betting prop bets bettors should avoid:

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Five Worst Super Bowl Prop Bets

The following props can be fun to bet on, but unless you don’t care about any chance of winning, these are not good bets to make:

Coin Toss

The Super Bowl coin toss has become a spectacle in its own right, with a global audience tuning in and more people placing bets on this single flip than on any other coin toss worldwide.

Despite its excitement, betting on the Super Bowl coin toss is not a wise decision for those looking to gamble responsibly. It’s purely a game of chance, offering a 50/50 probability that doesn’t swing in favor of either side – heads or tails – making it a bet without any strategic basis.

Statistical data from past Super Bowls reveals a narrow preference for tails, which has hit 30 times versus the 27 occurrences of heads. This slim edge was evident again during Super Bowl 57, when the Kansas City Chiefs successfully called tails, thereby slightly extending the lead of tails in the historical record.

It’s important to acknowledge this pattern does not indicate a reliable trend or a way to predict future outcomes. The coin toss is unpredictable by nature, lacking any element of skill or strategy that might influence the odds, making any bets placed on it a matter of sheer luck.

Length of the National Anthem

Among Super Bowl prop bets, the duration of the national anthem performance is a well-known tradition among gamblers. This particular type of bet became available in 2007, opening a new avenue for betting enthusiasts to engage with the event.

That year, Billy Joel’s anthem performance was shorter than the set betting line. Fast forward to 2023 when Chris Stapleton performed, and, once again, the anthem was shorter than the predicted time.

Accurately guessing the anthem’s duration is challenging. It varies significantly year by year. For instance, Alicia Keys’ rendition at Super Bowl 47 lasted 2 minutes, 36 seconds, much longer than the average of 1 minute, 43 seconds for anthem performances since the bet was introduced.

RELATED: Ten Super Low-Risk Super Bowl Bets

Kickoff return for TD to start the game

Since the inception of the Super Bowl, this has only happened once. In Super Bowl XLI, Devin Hester of the Chicago Bears ran back the opening kickoff 92 yards for a touchdown.

Given this scarce history, the probability of it happening is exceedingly low, and the odds are generally not in favor of those taking the risk on such an unpredictable outcome.

RELATED: The Best Super Bowl 58 Kicker Props

Team to score first

Betting on which team will score first in a game is essentially gambling based on intuition, as it’s nearly impossible to gain a definitive edge.

The outcome is influenced by a multitude of factors, including but not limited to the initial possession of the ball, which is typically determined by the opening coin toss.

These factors introduce a high degree of unpredictability, reducing the bet to mere guessing games.

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Big Man TD

This specific prop bet is inspired by a memorable Super Bowl XX touchdown, when William “The Refrigerator” Perry, a defensive lineman for the Chicago Bears, scored a touchdown, leaving a lasting legacy in NFL lore.

StatMuse’s data highlights that since 2022, only one offensive lineman has managed to score a touchdown in the NFL.

This statistic emphasizes just how extraordinary and infrequent such occurrences are. The significant improbability of it happening makes it a very unwise bet for any NFL games, let alone the Super Bowl.

RELATED: Five Under-the-Radar Super Bowl Bets

About the Author

Sam Eggleston

Sam Eggleston is a sports journalist and editor who resides in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. He has worked for a variety of news organizations, including digital media companies SB Nation and Issue Media Group and print newspapers for Gannett, Morris and Ogden.